Roberson Law, LLC.

August 3, 2014

National Immigration Project

Comments are off
I have found that the following website contains quite a bit of useful immigration information: http://www.nationalimmigrationproject.org/legalresources/practice_advisories/pa_D
Immigration
Roberson Law, LLC.
Here is a portion of an article on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals that I recently wrote for the Johnson County Bar Letter.  The full text can be found here:  http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.jocobar.org/resource/resmgr/JoCoBar_summer2014-web.pdf On June 15, 2012, a significant change to immigration law occurred when Janet Napolitano, Secretary of DHS, issued a memorandum titled “Exercising Prosecutorial Discretion with Respect to Individuals Who Came to the United States as Children.”  The memo was directed to three sub-agencies of
Department of Homeland Security, Immigration, Immigration Court
Roberson Law, LLC.
Here is an excerpt of an article I recently completed for the Johnson County Bar Association Bar Letter: Immigration Court and the Department of Homeland Security DHS is a cabinet department of the U.S. government, and is comprised of the United States Customs and Immigration Services (USCIS), Customs and Border Protection (CBP), and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).  Pub.L. 107–296, 116 Stat. 2135.  ICE is the agency responsible for enforcing the nation’s immigration laws by effecting the removal of
Department of Homeland Security, Evidence, Immigration, Immigration Court
For non-citizens, criminal charges and convictions may carry severe consequences, up to and including removal from the United States.  Therefore, it is very important that such clients  consult with criminal defense attorneys who are familiar enough with immigration law to recognize when to seek the advice of a competent immigration attorney.   Excellent criminal defense advice may result in dire and unforeseen immigration consequences. The stakes are high for criminal defense attorneys, as well.  The U.S.
Immigration
Here is a copy of an article I wrote for the Johnson County Bar Letter:     One of the most important – and troublesome – concepts in immigration law is that of “unlawful presence.”  A person is “unlawfully present” if he or she is present in the United States “after the expiration of the period of stay authorized by the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security or is present in the United States without being admitted
Immigration